LGA 1155 supports some of the best Intel 2nd generation processors and delivers the best motherboard for LGA1155 that will make your processor run at its best capacity.

Read our small reviews of the best motherboards for LGA 1155 in the article below. We hope that you can find the best pick for your CPU!

A Comparison Table of Our Top 5 Best LGA1155 Mobos

ModelProsCons
ASUS P8B75• Excellent board for the price
• Comes with a stable chipset
• Great RAM compatibility
• Not too many heatsinks on the board itself
Intel DH61CR• Intel build quality
• Allows for some good overclocking
• Can support high frequency RAM modules
• SATA ports can sometimes malfunction
• Intel motherboard?
• Integrated graphics are not that great
Intel DH67BL• Intel build quality
• Allows for some good overclocking
• Can support high frequency RAM modules
• SATA ports can sometimes malfunction
• Intel motherboard?
ASRock P67 Pro 3• Ultra durable capacitors
• Support for the latest 1155 CPUs
• Comes with pre-updated BIOS
• You can do much overclocking on it
ASUS Maximus IV Gene-Z• Support for the latest 1155 CPUs
• Dual GPU support
• Large RAM memory capacity
• Tries to rip off other ROG motherboards
• The same old ASUS design

ASUS P8B75

ASUS P8B75

The Core i5 and i7 Processors of Intel’s second-generation require a new motherboard socket and chipset. Asus P8B75 has the necessary LGA1155 socket and is the cheapest of its three P67 chipset boards (also available in Pro and Deluxe versions). This chipset does not support the integrated graphics of the new processors but is designed for those who want to use a dedicated graphics card.

If you want to overclock your new Intel processor and you will probably find it easy to get extra performance, you must purchase a P67 board. Now we accept that overclocking and powerful graphics cards are often of interest to the same people, but we don’t see why Intel prevented overclocking on H67 boards–including support for Intel’s HD graphics–especially since integrated graphics are capable of this.

Asus’ P8B75 has all that you would expect of a modern board. There are two PCI-Express x16 slots, the latter 4x speed, and the two PCI-Express x1 slots and the USB3 controller share the bandwidth. None of these problems should occur unless you use dual graphics cards (in SLI or CrossFire X) to transfer files via USB3.

ASUS boards are the best of the best. The company is well known for making quality products, and their range of motherboards in no exception. We chose the ASUS P8B75 as the best motherboard for LGA1155!

Intel DH61CR

Intel DH61CR

DH61CR uses CPU socket Intel LGA 1155/Socket H2. Any Intel CPU compatible will have the same socket entry. It uses the DDR3 memory type with maximum speeds of up to 1333 MHz and 2 DDR3 slots that allow up to 8 GB of RAM. The Micro-ATX DH61CR should be suitable for all ATX cases, but its smaller size enables you to reduce the overall size of your system. Its size is at the cost of features so that there are probably far fewer connections and options for expansion than in a larger motherboard.

DH61CR enables graphics onboard. This enables integrated graphics to be paired with a supporting CPU. Integrated graphics are a cheap alternative to using a graphics card, but should be avoided if modern applications or games that require intensive graphics processing are often used. This motherboard has 1 PCIe x16 slots.

This means that it is perfectly able to accommodate the latest graphics cards, although it is important to try using a graphic card with the same specs as stated on the graphics card interface. The reason is that we’re unsure if a graphic card with lower specs will enable the full potential of the motherboard and a graphic card with better specs will reduce its performance due to the maximum bandwidth of the DH61CR. The DH61CR does not support multiple Nvidia SLI or AMD Crossfire graphics cards.

Intel DH67BL

Intel DH67BL

Intel’s H67 chipset was released in early 2011 in conjunction with the highly anticipated Intel’ Sandy Bridge’ 32 nm architecture. What distinguished Sandy Bridge was its integrated graphics hub, the first in the world of desktops.

The graphics core, or iGPU, shares some L3 cache with the four processing cores of the CPU properly and a new CPU socket was also born due to these architectural changes–the LGA1155 socket. The Intel Core i3/i5/i7 2xxx series Sandy Bridge Processor has been a great success since its release and has given AMD a real run for its money.

Despite its success, Intel’s integrated graphics still does not compete very well with discrete graphics cards, even a mainstream $50. Why do we like it, then? For most PCs sold by Dell and large system integrators, the upshot of a CPU with an integrated graphics core is lower costs. After all, 70% of the total PC volume sold today features integrated graphics. Motherboards like the Intel DH67BL that PCSTATS is reviewing today support a PCI Express 2.0 x16 video card, but a discrete graphics solution is more likely than not to be seen. The DH67BL motherboard has a single video output for DVI-I and HDMI.

ASRock P67 Pro 3

ASRock P67 Pro 3

The clearance around the socket is low profile, making it much easier and certainly wider to decide on which heat sinks. While the mounting size has changed, however, you will see that ASRock designed the board with mounting holes for the 775 and 1156 sockets. Therefore, if you already have a high-end HSF model, you can continue to use it, saving a nice amount of change that could lead to many other upgrades.

The P67 Pro3 uses an 8 + 2 phase power configuration to deliver stable power to the CPU and memory controller. The motherboard supports all new 1155 socket processors, including the’ K’ series unlocked.

There is also no lack of memory support on this mid-range motherboard. The Pro3 supports DDR3 2133(OC)/1866(OC)/1600/1333/1066 non-ECC, unbuffered memory in the hope of higher memory frequencies than the native DDR3-1333 on the current processor models (higher ends will support 1600).

We have found that the’ K’ processors do not support the increase of FSB, but only the increase of multipliers, so that these higher memory clocks are a must for higher performance. Each DIMM slot can be added up to 8 GB modules with a total memory capacity of 32 GB. The ATX power connector is located on the side of the DIMM slots.

ASUS Maximus IV Gene-Z

ASUS Maximus IV Gene-Z

The Maximus IV Gene-Z follows the traditional gene development path, as it is a more sensible, removed version of the ATX board, the Maximus IV Extreme-Z. However, don’t let that fool you to think it’s a less competent board. We have seen before that this process of shrinking the board can actually be useful, as Asus removes many of the unnecessary filler features that often make ROG boards feel bloated.

This certainly seems to be the case with the Gene-Z, because its list of features is relatively short for enthusiasts and gamers of a board. Fortunately, Asus was clever to consider what features should be left on the board.

Excessively fluffy features like ROG iDirect (which allows you to overclock the board via your smartphone) have been removed, while useful technologies such as the Debug LED readout, BIOS Print, and the X-Fi sound codec, remain on board.

Verdict

This concludes our guide of the top 5 best motherboards for LGA1155. We chose the ASUS P8B75 as our top pick, but the others on the list don’t fall that far behind. LGA1155 is a great CPU socket for Intel’s second-generation CPUs that even hold solidly today.

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